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Tuesday, May 01, 2018
Finding Your Research Voice

Participants from many disciplines gathered to learn about and practice their skills in research communication in an intensive workshop led by Cornell physics professor Itai Cohen and Missouri State theatre and performing arts professor Melanie Dreyer-Lude. Working their bodies and voice to create engaging beginnings, focused core messages and clear slides, participants were videotaped and engaged in improvisation to improve the dramatic arc of their research presentation. Designed for busy graduate students and postdocs, this workshop is a teaser to the planned June 25-28 workshop on Finding Your Research Voice. 

Participant shared what is the most important thing they learned:

"Telling a compelling story is important." (LASSP)

"Storytelling! The dramatic arc and how to apply to my talk. Great mix of general ideas and then applying to my stuff. Did not feel like all day! Time flies when you are having fun!" (Genetics, and Genomic Development)

"Techniques to hone my message. Ideas on how to present my material a little different. Thank you for a fantastic workshop!" (Population Medicine and Diagnostic Science)

"The idea of switching around the components of the dramatic arc to improve the story was really interesting, and I think it will really help me to improve my talks. This was super fun!" (Entomology)

"I liked most how the instructors taught us to flip our presentations and elevator pitches." (Animal Science) 

"How to successfully catch an audience's attention at the beginning of a talk.  How to modify and create a strong core message. Other skills like how to walk and speak loudly and with proper gestures. The environment and everyone made me feel comfortable.  Both of the instructors are enthusiastic and friendly.  Overall I enjoyed the workshop.  Good amount of activities and revising to mix things up." (Biological and Biomedical Sciences)

"Detailed tips about presentation style (breathing, hands, walking...) and presentation structure.  Fitting the presentation into a story." (Civil and Environmental Engineering)